2010-georgische Klage-Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte

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Tbilisi lädt Moskau zu Gesprächen bzgl. des Verfahrens vor dem Int. Gerichtshof - 28.06.2011, Civil Georgia
In an attempt to pave way for its case against Russia in the Hague-based International Court of Justice (ICJ), Tbilisi invited Moscow in formal negotiations over its allegations that Moscow committed "ethnic cleansing" in South Ossetia and "ethnically motivated violence" in Abkhazia.
In its case filed before the ICJ shortly after the August, 2008 war, Georgia claimed that Russia violated its obligations under the 1965 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD-Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination) during three distinct phases of its interventions in South Ossetia and Abkhazia in the period from 1990 to August 2008.
On April 1 ICJ upheld Russia's one of the arguments and ruled that it had no jurisdiction to consider Georgia's case on its merit on the grounds that Tbilisi neither attempted to negotiate specifically CERD-related matters with the Russian Federation nor used other mode of dispute resolution before referring the case directly to ICJ.
Georgia said shortly after that ruling that it would try to resolve, what it called, “technical” problems - which was absence of formal talks with Moscow specifically on CERD-related matter - in order to pave the way for consideration of the case on its merit by the ICJ.
Three months later Georgia made a formal request to Russia via a mediator to launch these talks. A relevant note was handed over by Georgian Deputy Foreign Minister, Nino Kalandadze, to Swiss ambassador in Tbilisi. Switzerland acts as a mediator between Russia and Georgia after the two countries cut diplomatic relations following the August war.
"Georgia took into consideration the Judgment of the International Court of Justice of April 1, 2011, in which the ICJ has established the fact of the existence of dispute between Georgia and the Russian Federation, however has indicated the necessity of holding direct negotiations between the two States in the framework of the above-mentioned Convention," the Georgian Foreign Ministry said in a statement on June 27.
"It is noteworthy that Georgia has repeatedly attempted to resolve the disputes under Convention with Russian Federation through negotiations, including both prior to and since the commencement of major hostilities in August 2008, however no adequate reaction followed from Russian side," it said.

Georgien erklärt, dass die Entscheidung des int. Gerichtshofs Raum läßt für weitere juristische Schritte gegn Russland - 01.04.2011, Civil Georgia
“This case is not over with today’s hearing,” Tina Burjaliani, the deputy justice minister, who was representing the Georgian government at the hearings, said in a televised remarks from The Hague. “We are not going to stop our pursuit of justice because of coming upon a simple obstacle. We believe that this dispute should be resolved through international legal means and Russia should be held responsible for its illegal acts.” In a written statement released shortly after the ruling was announced the Georgian government said that the ICJ’s decision “leaves open the possibility that once formal negotiations have been exhausted, it will have jurisdiction over the case.” ...
Georgien's Fall gegen Russland scheitert darin, in der Sache selbst am Gerichtshof fortzufahren - 01.04.2011, Civil Georgia
  • Georgia's Reaction to ICJ's Ruling
  • Russia's Reaction to ICJ's Ruling 
  • In its case filed before ICJ more than two years ago, Georgia claimed that Russia violated its obligations under the 1965 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) during three distinct phases of its interventions in South Ossetia and Abkhazia in the period from 1990 to August 2008. ...

    Int. Gerichthof wird um den 1.April über die russ. Einwände entscheiden, die von Georgien vorgetragen hatte - 11.03.2010, Civil Georgia
    International Court of Justice (ICJ) will deliver its judgment on Russia’s preliminary objections in the case filed by Tbilisi against Moscow over two years ago on April 1.
    The Hague-based court said on March 15, that President of the court, Judge Hisashi Owada, will read the judgment at a public sitting. In its case filed before ICJ on August 12, 2008, Georgia claims Russia violated its obligations under the 1965 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) during three distinct phases of its interventions in South Ossetia and Abkhazia in the period from 1990 to August 2008. Russia’s preliminary objections involve its claim that ICJ has no jurisdiction to hear the case. The sides presented their oral arguments before the court about Russia’s objections during the two rounds of public hearings held between September 13 and September 17, 2010. Russia requested ICJ to declare that it lacks jurisdiction over the claims brought by Georgia and the latter requested the court to dismiss Russia’s objections and to accept Georgia’s case against Russia as admissible.  If the court decides in favor of Georgia and rules that it has jurisdiction, ICJ will hold separate hearings later on the merits of the complaint.
    ICJ to Decide on Merits of Georgia v Russia Case 
    First Round of Georgia v. Russia Hearings at ICJ
    ICJ Starts Public Hearing on Georgia v. Russia Case 
    UN Court Orders Russia, Georgia to Protect Ethnic Groups 
    Georgia Files Lawsuit against Russia in ICJ

    134 Georgier reichen Klagen am europäischen Gerichtshof für Menschenrechte ein; sie klagen gegen Russland wegen der Verletzung etlicher europäischer Menschenrechte wahrend des Krieges im August 2008 - 09.02.2010, Civil Georgia
    134 Georgian citizens lodged complaints to the Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) last week, claiming that Russia violated number of European human rights laws against them during the 2008, August war.
    Tbilisi-based Georgian young Lawyers’ Association (GYLA) and its London-based partner European Human Rights Advocacy Center (EHRAC), acting on behalf of the 134 applicants, said the applications primarily concern cases of shelling and air attacks on villages; destruction of property and the killing or injuring of civilians and the deliberate burning and looting of houses.
    The applications, which are in 34 groups, originate from the Georgian villages within the breakaway South Ossetia and the surrounding areas (Achabeti, Argvitsi, Atsriskhevi, Avlevi, Berula, Brotsleti, Dzartsemi, Dvani, Eredvi, Kekhvi, Kere, Kitsnisi, Ksuisi, Kurta, Satskheneti, Tkviavi, Vanati, Zardiaantkari and Zemo Khviti), as well as from the town of Gori.
    “These cases raise important questions about the applicability of the ECHR to a conflict situation, and they will also test the ‘reach’ of the ECHR - the applicants are asking the Court to find Russia responsible for violations perpetrated by its armed forces outside Russian territory,” EHRAC said.
    “The Court will also be asked to decide that the Russian Federation was responsible both for the actions of its armed forces and of Ossetian militia.”
    The complaints have been lodged against Russia based on the principle of “effective control”, which the Russian forces have been exerting on the territories concerned, Natia Katsitadze, a lawyer with GYLA, told Civil.Ge
    Last January, ECHR said it had examined seven applications lodged against Georgia in connection with the August war and the Chamber decided to give priority to these applications.
    These applications were lodged by six residents of South Ossetia and a member of the Russian armed forces attached to the peacekeeping troops in Tskhinvali, according to ECHR.
    In these cases the applicants claim violation of their or their close relatives’ right to life, inhuman or degrading treatment, interference with the right to respect for private and family life and home, damage to property or its destruction, absence of an effective domestic remedy and discrimination on the ground of ethnic origin.
    früher:
    ECHR to Hear Georgia vs. Russia Caseeign Ministry said.
    ECHR to Hear Georgia vs. Russia Case - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 4 Jul.'09 / 14:12
    European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) said on July 3 it found Georgia’s complaints against Russia over deportations admissible for hearing.
    The Strasbourg-based court said in a statement that it “has declared admissible the application lodged in the case of Georgia v. Russia.”
    “The Court’s admissibility decision in no way prejudges the merits of the Georgian Government’s complaints. The Court will deliver its judgment at a later date,” it said.
    Tbilisi wants Moscow to reimburse pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages for the alleged violation of the rights of hundreds of ethnic Georgians deported from the Russian Federation.
    Over 2,000 ethnic Georgians were deported from Russia in late September 2006 and early 2007 following Russian-Georgian spy row.

    Tbilisi Refuses to Drop Case against Russia at ECHR - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 28 Feb.'08 / 18:43
    Tbilisi will not withdraw an interstate application lodged against Russia to the Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), Georgian officials said on February 28.
    Tbilisi wants Moscow to reimburse pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages for the alleged violation of the rights of hundreds of ethnic Georgians deported from the Russian Federation. Over 2,000 ethnic Georgians were deported from Russia in late September 2006 and early 2007 against the backdrop of Russo-Georgian tensions, which hit boiling point following a spy row between the two countries.
    “We still believe that the rights of our citizens were violated and we continue to hold that position,” Nika Gvaramia, the Georgian justice minister, told Mze TV on February 28. Gvaramia was actually in charge of studying individual deportees' cases in early 2007.
    The Russian side has sent a 235-page rebuttal to the ECHR, the Russian daily Kommersant reported on February 27. The newspaper suggested that Georgia might withdraw its complaint amid recent signs of improved bi-lateral relations.
    Nino Burjanadze, the parliamentary chairperson, however, said on February 28 that although Georgia wanted to improve relations with Russia, it would “not [happen] at the expense of the interests of Georgian citizens.”
    Georgia Brings Russia to European Court over Deportations - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 27 Mar.'07 / 18:07, Nino Khutsidze
    Tbilisi wants Moscow to reimburse pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages for the alleged violation of the rights of hundreds of ethnic Georgians who have been deported from the Russian Federation.
    The Georgian Justice Ministry lodged an interstate application to the Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on March 26 against the Russian Federation.
    Over 2,000 ethnic Georgians have been deported from Russia since late September, 2006 against the background of Russo-Georgian tensions, which hit boiling point following a spy row between the two countries.
    It will be the sixth state vs. state case in the ECHR if the court rules favorably on the admissibility of Georgia’s application, Besarion Bokhashvili, Georgia’s state representative to the Court, said on March 27.
    Russia has already warned that the lawsuit would not help to normalize relations between the two countries.
    Bokhashvili said the 70-page lawsuit, which was prepared by the Justice Ministry with the assistance of a group of British legal consultants, contains the cases of about 150 Georgian deportees, including three who died awaiting deportation.
    Zurab Muzashvili, who suffered from tuberculosis, died in a detention center in the Russian town of Engels in the Saratov District in January, 2007. Manana Jabelia, 51, died in a detention center in Moscow in December, 2006 and Tengiz Togonidze, 48, died of an asthma attack on October 17 in Domodedovo airport in Moscow, shortly before he was due to be deported to Georgia.
    The Georgian authorities claim that all three people died due to negligence on the part of the Russian authorities, in particular their failure to provide adequate medical treatment to detainees.
    “We have decided to record approximately 150 cases and submit them because these are the strongest cases,” Bokhashvili told reporters.
    Video files including interviews with deportees have been attached to the lawsuit as supporting evidence.
    “We want the Court to give a legal assessment to all those facts involving the violation of the rights of deportees… The Court may rule that Russia should reimburse pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages to that person whose rights have been violated,” Georgia’s state representative to the ECHR said.
    He declined to comment on what figure Georgia will demand from Russia, but added that “it will be quite a reasonable sum.”
    The Georgian authorities maintain that the Russian side is in violation of the following provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights:
    Prohibition of collective expulsion of aliens;
    Procedural safeguards relating to expulsion of aliens: the deportees were not allowed to submit arguments against their deportation;
    Right to life;
    Prohibition of torture: deportees were detained in unbearable conditions;
    Right to liberty and security: deportees were arbitrarily detained and they were prevented from challenging the lawfulness of their detention;
    Right to respect for private and family life: school principals in Moscow were instructed by the authorities to forward private information about pupils with Georgian ethnicity;
    Protection of property: access to property in the Russian Federation was denied to deportees;
    Right to education: Russian authorities requested that school administrations submit information about Georgian pupils to local divisions of Militia (Russian Police Service); the pupils and teachers of Russian schools in Georgia under the supervision of the Russian Federation (#9 School in Tbilisi and #17 in Batumi) were denied access to the schools;
    Right to an effective remedy;
    Prohibition of discrimination: deportations were carried out on national ground;
    Limitation on use of restrictions on rights.
    “Of course, the Russian side will claim that these accusations are groundless, but now it is up to the Court to decide who is right,” Bokhashvili told Civil.Ge on March 27.
    “The fact in itself that we have lodged an application already means that we have a strong case,” he added.
    Theoretically it is possible to reach “a friendly settlement” with Russia; but Georgia does not see this as an option at this stage, Bokhashvili said.
    Justice Minister Gia Kavtaradze told Georgian lawmakers in February, when the authorities were still undecided whether to file the lawsuit or not, that the government needed very strong evidence.
    “I cannot allow us to lose if we file the lawsuit,” Kavtaradze said then.

    Russian MFA Comments on Georgia's ECHR Lawsuit - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 28 Mar.'07 / 11:18
    Georgia’s decision to file an interstate lawsuit against Russia at the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) is an “unfriendly” move, the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement on March 27.
    In a lawsuit submitted to the ECHR on March 26 Tbilisi is seeking pecuniary and non-pecuniary damages from Moscow for the alleged violation of the rights of hundreds of ethnic Georgians who have been deported from the Russian Federation since late September 2006.
    “The Russian side has clarified the situation on several occasions and has denied all allegations made,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said in the statement.
    The statement goes on to state that Georgia’s decision to file the lawsuit was part of its “anti-Russian propaganda” which aimed at securing “foreign support for its [Tbilisi’s] irresponsible policy regarding the Georgian-Abkhaz and Georgian-Ossetian conflicts.”
    “The Georgian side had an opportunity to continue the joint work towards the improvement of relations, which seemed to have been underway, in a calm and non-confrontational line; but unfortunately, Tbilisi has chosen other options. The Georgian side should understand that this is yet another unfriendly move against Russia and that it will be bad news for bilateral relations,” the Russian Foreign Ministry stated.

    Tbilisi Undecided over Georgia vs. Russia Lawsuit - / 14 Feb.'07 / 14:58
    Civil Georgia
    Official Tbilisi has talked of filing a case against Russia in the Strasbourg-based European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) regarding reported cases of abuse of the rights of Georgians deported from Russia in recent months. But there has been some hesitation as such a lawsuit would need strong evidence and would also represent a serious political decision, Georgian officials say.
    Georgia has to make a final decision within a month because the lawsuit’s statute of limitations expires in late March, Beso Bokhashvili, Georgia's state representative to the ECHR, told lawmakers on February 13.
    A special committee of the Georgian Parliament that was set up last October to look into cases of human rights abuses against Georgians in Russia summoned Justice Minister Gia Kavtaradze and Georgia’s consular officer to Russia, Zurab Pataridze, to brief lawmakers about possible lawsuit against Russia.
    “Do not think that we have no evidence at all. We do have evidence, but we need more and stronger evidence to file a lawsuit,” Justice Minister Kavtaradze told the commission.
    He said that the Justice Ministry is building a case based on testimonies provided by 450 Georgian citizens who have been deported from Russia since last October.
    He said the cases involve the violation of a number of provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights, including the prohibition of collective expulsion, the deprivation of the right to life, and discrimination on the grounds of ethnicity.
    A total of 2,380 ethnic Georgians have been deported from Russia since last October against the background of Russo-Georgian tensions, which hit its lowest following a spy row between the two countries, Georgia’s consul to Russia Zurab Pataridze told lawmakers on February 13.
    Three Georgians died awaiting deportation. The most recent case occurred on January 25, when Zurab Muzashvili, who suffered from tuberculosis, died in a detention center in the Russian town of Engels in the Saratov District before he was deported. The Georgian consul in Russia said Muzashvili died do to negligence on the part of the Russian authorities.
    Manana Jabelia, 51, died in a detention center in Moscow on December 2, six weeks after she was arrested.
    Tengiz Togonidze, a 48-year-old Georgian citizen, died of an asthma attack on October 17 in Domodedovo airport in Moscow shortly before being deported to Georgia.
    Georgian consul Pataridze also said that up to 60 enterprises owned by ethnic Georgians were closed down in Russia under various pretexts.
    Despite these numerous “convincing facts” it is hard to obtain “strong evidence” backing them, Justice Minister Kavtaradze said.
    “We can hardly obtain such evidence, I mean documents or papers signed by the Russian official structures, or court rulings,” Kavtaradze said.
    He noted that there have been cases when official papers issued by the courts on deportation have been seized from Georgians prior to their deportation.
    “Our task is to strengthen the existing facts with concrete evidence. I cannot allow losing this case if we file the lawsuit,” Kavtaradze added.
    This cautious approach towards the issue is a setback from the initial hard-line stance of the Georgian authorities.
    In late October, Justice Minister Kavtaradze and other Georgian officials were determined to file the lawsuit against Russia.
    Some opposition lawmakers allege that the absence of “strong evidence” may only be a pretext to refrain from filing the lawsuit, as the Georgian authorities may now be in favor of a more conciliatory stance towards Russia after Moscow sent its Ambassador back to Tbilisi in January.
    The Georgian consul to the Russian Federation noted at the hearings on February 13 that cases of “persecution of Georgians” in Russia and deportations of Georgians from Russia have significantly decreased in 2007.
    An alternative to the state-versus-state option is for the deported Georgians to file individual lawsuits filed against Russia.
    Although Gia Kavtaradze says that the Georgian Justice Ministry is ready to provide legal consulting to the individuals concerned, he showed a cautious approach in this regard as well.
    “The European Court of Human Rights does not welcome when a state openly backs an individual lawsuit,” Kavtaradze warned lawmakers at the February 13 hearings.
    Tbilisi-based non-governmental advocacy group Georgian Young Lawyers’ Association (GYLA) said that it can provide legal consultancy to those deportees willing to file lawsuits against Russia.
    But Giorgi Chkheidze of the GYLA recently said that the group needs to know exactly what the government’s plans are in this regard in order to decide whether to pursue efforts or to let the authorities take action.

    Georgia Files Lawsuit Against Russia in ECHR - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 26 Mar.'07 / 19:45
    Georgia has lodged an interstate application to the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) against the Russian Federation, the Justice Ministry reported on March 26.
    The case concerns reported violation of rights of ethnic Georgians, who have been deported from Russia since October, 2006.
    Georgia claims that the Russian authorities have violated a number of provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights, including the prohibition of collective expulsion, the denial of the right to life, and discrimination on the grounds of ethnicity.
    Spokesperson for the Russian Foreign Ministry Alexander Kaminin told Interfax news agency on March 26 that Georgia’s lawsuit against Russia would not promote “the normalization of relations between the two countries.”
    The ECHR has yet to decide about the admissibility of the application lodged by the Georgian Justice Ministry.

    Parliament Calls for Filing ECHR Lawsuit Against Russia - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 16 Feb.'07 / 20:03
    Hundreds of Georgians were collectively expelled from the Russian Federation illegally because of their ethnic background in an anti-Georgian campaign that was authorized by the Russian officials, the conclusion of a Georgian special parliamentary commission said.
    The commission was set up last October to look into cases of human rights abuses against Georgians in Russia.
    Chairman of the commission MP Nika Gvaramia presented the conclusion at the parliamentary session on February 16.
    The conclusion is a detailed summary of dozens of Georgians deported from Russia after a spy row erupted between the two countries last September.
    The document includes the cases of four Georgians – Manana Jabelia, Tengiz Togonidze, Revaz Berulava and Zurab Muzashvili – who died before being deported from Russia. According to the document, all of them died due to negligence on the part of the Russian authorities.
    The decision to expel Georgian citizens from Russia was made “without assessing the actual and legal circumstances, in a short period of time irrelevant to court discussions, through violating the fundamental rights of Georgian citizens, including the right of defense and appealing of court rulings.”
    “Before standing trial and the execution of the courts' rulings, the Georgian citizens were kept in pre-trial detention cells in extremely grave, inhumane conditions that can be considered as a restraint of freedom under conditions of torture and ill-treatment,” the commission said.
    The conclusion also notes that the deported citizens no longer have access to their movable and immovable property left on the territory of Russian Federation.
    “This should be considered an illegal restriction of property rights by the Russian Federation,” the conclusion reads.
    Lawmakers from both the ruling National Movement and opposition parties hailed the conclusion.
    The parliament unanimously passed a resolution on February 16 condemning Russia’s actions against Georgians.
    The parliament also recommended the Georgian Justice Ministry to protect the interests of those Georgians whose rights were abused in the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).
    This recommendation is not legally binding for the government, and it is still not clear whether Tbilisi will file a lawsuit against Russia in the ECHR.

    Georgia Hesitant over ECHR Lawsuit Against Russia - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 6 Feb.'07 / 14:21
    Georgia is building a case to file a lawsuit against Russia in the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) over the alleged abuse of Georgians’ rights who have been deported from Russia in recent months. However, the lawsuit will be filed only after “strong evidence” is gathered and after a “political decision” is made by the Georgian leadership, Georgian Justice Minister Gia Kavtaradze said in an interview with the Georgian daily Rezonansi (Resonance) published on February 6.
    “We will file a lawsuit if we are confident that we will win the case. We have numerous facts of xenophobia at our disposal; however, a fact in itself does not mean evidence,” Gia Kavtaradze said.
    “We have questioned deportees, recorded their testimonies; but these facts now need to be backed by strong evidence,” he added.
    The Justice Minister reiterated these statements at a news conference after the government’s session on February 6.
    The remarks triggered opposition lawmakers to assume that the Georgian authorities have stepped back from their initial intentions to file a lawsuit against Russia.
    “I do not understand what additional evidence the authorities need. We have about 3 000 deportees and we know that at least 400 of them were residing in Russia legally and were paying taxes,” MP Gia Tsagareishvili from the opposition Industrialists Party, who is member of the parliamentary commission that was set up to probe into deportation cases, said.
    “The Georgian leadership’s decision to give up plans to file a lawsuit against Russia is part of a deal. As time goes by, we learn more and more about the details of a meeting between President Saakashvili and President Putin in Minsk [last November],” MP Kakha Kukava from the opposition Conservative Party told the Rezonansi.

    Senior MP Speaks Tough on Deportation of Georgians - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 5 Dec.'06 / 09:37
    79 Georgians remain in detention centers in Russia awaiting deportation, Georgian MP Nika Gvaramia said on December 4.
    MP Gvaramia, who is a chairman of the parliamentary commission that was set up to look into cases of human rights abuses against Georgians in Russia, said that the Georgian authorities are now considering sending a plane to Russia to assist detainees, who are accused of migration offenses, in returning to Georgia.
    Gvaramia said that Manana Jabelia, 51, who died in a detention center in Moscow on December 2, six weeks after she was arrested, “became a victim of the Russian authorities.”
    “I can say openly, without any hesitation, that Jabelia was murdered by the Russian authorities. She was a refugee from Abkhazia and stateless person and no one had a right to deport her, and even if she was there illegally she still had a right to be treated humanely. Officials there [in Moscow] could have at least given her medicine,” MP Gvaramia said on a political talk show aired on Tbilisi-based Imedi television on December 4.
    Relatives of Jabelia told Georgian television stations that she suffered from heart problems.
    Tengiz Togonidze, a 48-year-old Georgian citizen, died of an asthma attack on October 17 in Domodedovo airport in Moscow before being deported to Georgia.

    CoE Chief Concerned over Death of Georgian Awaiting Deportation - Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 5 Dec.'06 / 15:32
    The death of the second Georgian citizen awaiting deportation from Russia in the past two months “is a cause for concern,” Council of Europe Secretary General Terry Davis said on December 5.
    Manana Jabelia, 51, died in a detention center in Moscow on December 2, six weeks after she was arrested.
    Davis said that an investigation of the circumstances leading to the death is ongoing, “and we shall be looking closely at the results, especially with regard to medical treatment provided” to Manana Jabelia.
    “The surge in deportations of Georgian citizens which followed the recent deterioration of bilateral relations between the two countries is also a cause for concern. Ordinary citizens should not pay for disagreements between governments,” he added.
    79 Georgians currently remain in detention centers in Russia awaiting deportation, Georgian MP Nika Gvaramia, who is a chairman of the parliamentary commission that was set up to look into cases of human rights abuses against Georgians in Russia, said on December 5.
    He also told lawmakers on December 5 that over 3 000 Georgians have been deported from Russia since early October.
    Terry Davis also said that while the Russian authorities are fully entitled to enforce their immigration rules, they should make sure that the laws comply with CoE standards and are not applied in an arbitrary or inhumane manner.
    Tengiz Togonidze, a 48-year-old Georgian citizen, died of an asthma attack on October 17 in Domodedovo airport in Moscow before being deported to Georgia.

    Georgia Calls on Russia to Stop Targeting Ethnic Georgians
    Civil Georgia, Tbilisi / 25 Oct.'06 / 11:18
    The Georgian Foreign Ministry said in a statement issued on October 24 that although the international community has condemned the xenophobic campaign unleashed against Georgians in the Russian Federation, the Russian authorities still continue to persecute ethnic Georgians.
    Tbilisi once again categorically demanded that the Russian side put an immediate end to ethnic targeting of citizens and follow a path of negotiations and constructive dialogue to settle political problems.
    According to the Georgian Foreign Ministry, the immigration service and respective agencies of the Russian Interior Ministry try to ‘reveal’ citizens of Georgia and ethnic Georgians by various methods. For example: ethnic Georgians are detained in the streets under the pretext of checking their papers; schools and institutions receive inquiries to disclose lists of pupils and students with Georgian surnames; special purpose units enter commercial enterprises owned by Georgians; there are reports of district inspectors calling on Georgian citizens in their homes and taking their passports to courts where deportation orders are issued against them in absentia.
    “In the persecution of the citizens of Georgia, representatives of the Russian authorities, apart from acting in defiance of universally recognized human rights and freedoms, breach norms of the Russian legislation as well... which do not, for some unknown reason, apply to Georgian citizens repressed solely due to their ethnic origin,” the Georgian For
    Hintergrund - background >>

    Tbilisi Refuses to Drop Case against Russia at ECHR
    Georgia Brings Russia to European Court over Deportations

    Russian MFA Comments on Georgia’s ECHR Lawsuit
    Tbilisi Undecided over Georgia vs. Russia Lawsuit
    Georgia Files Lawsuit Against Russia in ECHR
    Parliament Calls for Filing ECHR Lawsuit Against Russia
    Georgia Hesitant over ECHR Lawsuit Against Russia
    Senior MP Speaks Tough on Deportation of Georgians
    CoE Chief Concerned over Death of Georgian Awaiting Deportation
    Georgia Calls on Russia to Stop Targeting Ethnic Georgians
    Minister: Georgia is Preparing Deportees’ Case for ECHR
    Georgia Says Russia’s “Inhumane Act” Caused Man’s Death
    Georgian Parliament Condemns Russia’s "Xenophobia"
    Georgia Calls on Russia to Stop Targeting Ethnic Georgians
    Moscow Rally Protests against 'Anti-Georgian Hysteria'
    PACE Monitors Call for Mutual Respect in Russo-Georgia Relations
    MPs Set up Commission to Study Treatment of Georgians in Russia
    Georgia Says Russia’s “Inhumane Act” Caused Man’s Death
    Georgian Parliament Condemns Russia’s "Xenophobia"
    Georgia Considers Putting Deportees' Case to ECHR
    Moscow Rally Protests against 'Anti-Georgian Hysteria'
    Echo Mosvky Radio Launches ‘I am Georgian’ Campaign
    Kasyanov: Chauvinist Hysteria Must Stop
    Reports: Police Track Down Georgians in Moscow
    Russian Migration Service: Every Hundredth Georgian is a Criminal